Can you take Seroquel if you have sleep apnea?

A recent Health Canada review linked quetiapine and other so-called “atypical” antipsychotics to an increased risk of sleep apnea —breaks in breathing during sleep.

Can you take Quetiapine if you have sleep apnea?

Respiratory function should be monitored when using quetiapine in patients with possible sleep apnea, particularly in obese patients and when given in combination with benzodiazepines.

Does Seroquel suppress breathing?

You may experience an increase in side effects such as excessive sedation, slowed rate of breathing, confusion, agitation, or loss of coordination.

Does Seroquel affect breathing?

Quetiapine can cause a severe allergic reaction. Symptoms can include: trouble breathing.

What medications make sleep apnea worse?

There are a number of sleeping pills which can make untreated sleep apnea worse. Some examples include: Ambien (Zolpidem), Klonopin (Clonazepam), Halcion (Triazolam), Restoril (Temazepam), Lunesta (Eszopiclone), and Sonata (Zaleplon). These medications are sedating and help induce sleep.

What can replace Seroquel for sleep?

Conclusions: With respect to total sleep time and nighttime awakenings, trazodone was a more effective alternative than quetiapine. However, patients receiving trazodone experienced more gastrointestinal patient-reported side effects.

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Is Seroquel safe to take for sleep?

Its efficacy is poorly documented, and even low doses may have substantial side effects. There is thus reason to warn against prescribing quetiapine for sleep. Quetiapine is a second-generation antipsychotic approved for treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder and as supplementary treatment for depression.

When should you not take Seroquel?

a disorder of the blood vessels of the brain. orthostatic hypotension, a form of low blood pressure. constipation. liver problems.

Can Seroquel cause manic episodes?

Results: Available literature points toward an early induction of hypomania or mania with low dosage of quetiapine treatment (between 100 and 400 mg/day never exceeding 600 mg/day). Hypomania or mania are possible short term complications that can be present few days to few weeks of treatment initiation.

Is 25mg of quetiapine a lot?

Off-label use was most evident for the 25 mg strength of quetiapine. The usual therapeutic dose range for the approved indications is 400–800 mg/day. The 25 mg dose has no uses that are evidence based other than for dose titration in older patients.

What can I take instead of Seroquel?

(quetiapine)

  • Seroquel (quetiapine) Prescription only. 56% of people say it’s worth it. …
  • 5 alternatives.
  • Risperdal (risperidone) Prescription only. …
  • Abilify (aripiprazole) Prescription only. …
  • Haldol (haloperidol) Prescription only. …
  • Zyprexa (olanzapine) Prescription only. …
  • Invega (paliperidone) Prescription only.

Why is Seroquel bad for you?

Quetiapine can cause significant weight gain, even when used in small to moderate doses for sleep. It has also been associated with increased blood glucose (sugar) and dyslipidaemia (an imbalance of fats circulating in the blood). These increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

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Who should not take quetiapine?

Who should not take QUETIAPINE FUMARATE?

  • breast cancer.
  • a condition with low thyroid hormone levels.
  • diabetes.
  • a high prolactin level.
  • excessive fat in the blood.
  • low amount of magnesium in the blood.
  • dehydration.
  • low amount of potassium in the blood.

What should I avoid if I have sleep apnea?

Burgers, steak, pork, bacon, lamb, and sausage are all meats that are high in saturated fats. Eating too much of these items can cause inflammation throughout your body, which can lead to cardiovascular problems. This is a big risk factor if you have sleep apnea, so it’s best to avoid consuming these products.

What is the best position to sleep if you have sleep apnea?

Side sleeping is the preferred position for helping calm your sleep apnea. Sleeping on your right side reduces snoring and encourages blood flow.

What worsens sleep apnea?

Medical conditions. Congestive heart failure, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes and Parkinson’s disease are some of the conditions that may increase the risk of obstructive sleep apnea. Polycystic ovary syndrome, hormonal disorders, prior stroke and chronic lung diseases such as asthma also can increase risk.

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