New article: Mental health and the patient politics of subsidiarity in Scotland

h-madness

The article “From associations to action: mental health and the patient politics of subsidiarity in Scotland” by Mark Gallagher might be of interest to h-madness readers. It was published on 27 March 2018 in Palgrave Communications 4.

The abstract reads:

In times of economic hardship public mental healthcare suffers a double disservice. On the one hand, it faces a diminution of existing resource, and on the other, it is met with vastly increased demand. The damage done to already hard-pressed public services during economic crises is often most keenly felt by those at the receiving end of statutory health and welfare provisions. When public services are deemed by its principal recipients to be no longer fit for purpose, it is unsurprising that they, along with others, look to agencies other than the state to meet their needs. In the final year of the 1970s, a decade in which Great…

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Publishing your PhD (or, the secret to a stressful life): Part I

A very thoughtful and poignant read!

The Clinic

In January, the monograph of my PhD was published. The process was neither short nor smooth, but it was a great learning curve. Now that the book is on the shelves, I can reflect on the experience with a certain equanimity. The finished product looks great (we’ll overlook a few minor typos and the suppurating syphilitic sores on the front cover). But at the time, my feelings oscillated between bemusement and exasperation.

My commissioning editor was wonderfully supportive throughout the whole, chaotic process, as were the series editors, Professor Michael Worboys and Professor Carsten Timmerman. But as I gear up for another book, I find myself reflecting on what I shall do differently. I hope my experiences will help other ECRs who are starting to think about publishing their own doctoral research.

The Book Proposal

It may seem obvious, but, before approaching a publisher, reconnoitre the terrain. Take stock of the books recently published in your…

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This is what precarity feels like: Early Career Researchers and “cruel optimism”

Extremely powerful!

All the Single Writing Ladies

The AHRC defines of “Early Career Researchers” (ECRs) as individuals “within eight years of the award of their PhD […] or within six years of their first academic appointment.” In practice, ECRs are a highly heterogeneous demographic comprising individuals in a range of employment circumstances, from hourly paid contracts and fixed term fellowships, to permanent roles. In this write-up of a paper I gave at the MeCCSA annual conference, I draw out some of the key themes arising from research on recent Arts and Humanities PhD graduates, individuals who often find themselves precariously employed.

In my research on Arts and Humanities researchers (published here), ECR respondents reported that their post-PhD career transitions were extremely challenging, for example using words like “tricky”, “tough”, or “emotionally dispiriting”.

In a nutshell, post-PhD transitions are characterised by:

  • Exploitative contracts (e.g. fractional, fixed term, zero hours, etc,)
  • ECRs conducting research unpaid, reliance on…

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Connect with ADHS at AHA 2018 in Washington, D.C.! — Points: The Blog of the Alcohol & Drugs History Society

Today, historians begin descending upon wintry Washington, D.C., for the 2018 meeting of the American Historical Association. AHA is the largest annual gathering for such professionals and their affiliated societies. Among those represented again this year is the Alcohol and Drugs History Society, with two panels of original research and one roundtable discussion. The date, […]

via Connect with ADHS at AHA 2018 in Washington, D.C.! — Points: The Blog of the Alcohol & Drugs History Society

Drug Tweets

A great day for historians of drugs and alcohol! Told in tweets.

Check it out.

professor of the academic dark arts – part one

An excellent and thought-provoking piece about…the dark arts in academia

patter

Professor of the dark academic arts. It’s a job. Yes, really. No, you never see this position advertised. But it exists. And not just in J K Rowling’s world. In real life. Professors of academic dark arts magick away other people’s work and get away with it. They cast spells which do in their competition.

We have all heard about the dark arts of stealthy plagiarism, unethical appropriation of other people’s research agendas, fudging research results.

200256570_bb657029c8_b.jpg

While there is emerging systematic evidence of extent of academic dark arts practice (see for example Retraction Watch, and herehere and here, and an interesting editorial here), there are loads and loads of stories. Stories about manipulation of experiments and cleansing of data. Stories about senior academics taking off with ideas generated by doctoral and early career researchers or their peers. Stories about early stage researchers being dismissed when…

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‘A jolt of intellectual electricity.’ Strathclyde University and the Scottish Crucible

Strathclyde leads the way in Scottish Crucible

https://www.strath.ac.uk/intranet/staffnews/headline_1115731_en.html

A record eight out of 30 places on the award-winning Scottish Crucible programme have been secured by Strathclyde researchers, recognising the outstanding potential of the University’s future research leaders.

Supported by the Scottish Funding Council, the Royal Society of Edinburgh, the Scottish Parliament and Heriot Watt University, Scottish Crucible brings together 30 of the most highly promising science, social science, humanities, and arts researchers in Scotland each year.

Its objective is to explore and expand the innovative potential of participants through a series of intensive, two-day events, or ‘labs’. Successful researchers, or Cruciblists, were selected from 14 institutions across Scotland this year.

The labs are specifically designed to help new academics enhance their understanding of how science can benefit society – as well as how thinking creatively can make a difference to their work and career.

The 2017 Strathclyde Cruciblists  are:

•         Dr Katherine Duncan (Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences)

•         Dr Natalia Gorenkova (Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences)

•         Dr Abigail Hird (Design, Manufacture and Engineering Management)

•         Dr Catherine Jones (Electronic and Electrical Engineering)

•         Dr Asimina Kazakidi (Biomedical Engineering)

•         Dr Brian Patton (Physics)

•         Dr Lucas Richert (History)

•         Dr Liu Yang (Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering).

Dr Richert said: “The Scottish Crucible was a jolt of intellectual electricity. Each lab struck a spectacular balance between fostering outside-the-box creativity and presenting practical engagement strategies.

“Importantly, the goal of bettering Scottish society was never once forgotten. It was an honour to participate.”

Professor William Kerr, Deputy Associate Principal (Research and Knowledge Exchange) at Strathclyde, said: “We are delighted that this excellent group of Strathclyde’s emerging high-calibre researchers has been recognised through this prestigious programme. Engagement with the various Scottish Crucible events will further develop the capability of these bold future leaders to deliver world-leading research and innovation to the benefit of society.”

The first Crucible lab was held in Edinburgh and focused on engaging with the media and policy makers. Cruciblists visited the Royal Society of Edinburgh, the Scottish Parliament, and the Scottish Government to learn about engaging with both the media and policy makers. The lab concluded with a panel of policy experts including Sir Paul Grice, Chief Executive of the Scottish Parliament, and Dr Audrey MacDougall, Chief Social Researcher at the Scottish Government.

The University of Stirling hosted the second lab, with a focus on UK research and innovation strategies and policies. The University of the West of Scotland will host the third lab at the start of July.

Each year Strathclyde provides internal assistance for potential applicants. Dr Emma Compton-Daw, of the University’s Organisational and Staff Development Unit (OSDU), along with previous Strathclyde Cruciblist mentors, offered advice on the career-enhancing benefits of applying for Scottish Crucible and provided direct support as part of the application process.

Applications for Scottish Crucible 2018 will open in December and staff interested in applying should contact OSDU for support.

Scottish Crucible. Round 2.

Round 2. Ding Ding.

The 2017 Scottish Crucible’s second lab was graciously hosted by Stirling University on June 1-2 and it rocked the campus. Literally. There was a blue man. A dinosaur. Drawing. Dancing. Sumptuous vistas. Oh yeah, there was a pretty nice castle too!

It began with this view.

Lab 2 was hosted by the irrepressible and commanding Sara Shinton. Honestly, sometimes the participants needed direction as they learnt the ins and outs of ‘brainstorming.’

(Or, as some of us called it: ‘thought-showering.’) No surprise, the phrase didn’t stick.

The thrust of Lab 2 was collaboration. We were enveloped in a cozy bubble, as Sara rightly put it.

How to work together! How to build lasting research partnerships to influence positive change! How to cut across fields and disciplines! The guest speakers were inspiring.

Being a drug historian, I have some thoughts about the tweet below but I’ll keep them to myself.

Chalk this up to aggressive dancing!

Day 2 included further in-depth training on how to develop and drive collaboration.

To start off with, we needed to draw out our research. No easy task.

However, there were other appearances.

For instance, a creepily self-satisfied Dragon…

An introspective blue dude…

DEFRA

But. But. But.

In my estimation, the most exhausting and rewarding moment of the weekend was…speed collaboration. Think speed dating, on steroids. (I am a drug historian).

The experience was supremely enjoyable. Also: Tiring. Amazing. Harrowing. Enriching. All of these. At the same time.

Minds were spinning.

Ding Ding. Bring on Round 3.

See the previous post on the Lab 1 here.

Or visit the Scottish Crucible here.

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