Drug Tweets

A great day for historians of drugs and alcohol! Told in tweets.

Check it out.

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professor of the academic dark arts – part one

An excellent and thought-provoking piece about…the dark arts in academia

patter

Professor of the dark academic arts. It’s a job. Yes, really. No, you never see this position advertised. But it exists. And not just in J K Rowling’s world. In real life. Professors of academic dark arts magick away other people’s work and get away with it. They cast spells which do in their competition.

We have all heard about the dark arts of stealthy plagiarism, unethical appropriation of other people’s research agendas, fudging research results.

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While there is emerging systematic evidence of extent of academic dark arts practice (see for example Retraction Watch, and herehere and here, and an interesting editorial here), there are loads and loads of stories. Stories about manipulation of experiments and cleansing of data. Stories about senior academics taking off with ideas generated by doctoral and early career researchers or their peers. Stories about early stage researchers being dismissed when…

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‘A jolt of intellectual electricity.’ Strathclyde University and the Scottish Crucible

Strathclyde leads the way in Scottish Crucible

https://www.strath.ac.uk/intranet/staffnews/headline_1115731_en.html

A record eight out of 30 places on the award-winning Scottish Crucible programme have been secured by Strathclyde researchers, recognising the outstanding potential of the University’s future research leaders.

Supported by the Scottish Funding Council, the Royal Society of Edinburgh, the Scottish Parliament and Heriot Watt University, Scottish Crucible brings together 30 of the most highly promising science, social science, humanities, and arts researchers in Scotland each year.

Its objective is to explore and expand the innovative potential of participants through a series of intensive, two-day events, or ‘labs’. Successful researchers, or Cruciblists, were selected from 14 institutions across Scotland this year.

The labs are specifically designed to help new academics enhance their understanding of how science can benefit society – as well as how thinking creatively can make a difference to their work and career.

The 2017 Strathclyde Cruciblists  are:

•         Dr Katherine Duncan (Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences)

•         Dr Natalia Gorenkova (Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences)

•         Dr Abigail Hird (Design, Manufacture and Engineering Management)

•         Dr Catherine Jones (Electronic and Electrical Engineering)

•         Dr Asimina Kazakidi (Biomedical Engineering)

•         Dr Brian Patton (Physics)

•         Dr Lucas Richert (History)

•         Dr Liu Yang (Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering).

Dr Richert said: “The Scottish Crucible was a jolt of intellectual electricity. Each lab struck a spectacular balance between fostering outside-the-box creativity and presenting practical engagement strategies.

“Importantly, the goal of bettering Scottish society was never once forgotten. It was an honour to participate.”

Professor William Kerr, Deputy Associate Principal (Research and Knowledge Exchange) at Strathclyde, said: “We are delighted that this excellent group of Strathclyde’s emerging high-calibre researchers has been recognised through this prestigious programme. Engagement with the various Scottish Crucible events will further develop the capability of these bold future leaders to deliver world-leading research and innovation to the benefit of society.”

The first Crucible lab was held in Edinburgh and focused on engaging with the media and policy makers. Cruciblists visited the Royal Society of Edinburgh, the Scottish Parliament, and the Scottish Government to learn about engaging with both the media and policy makers. The lab concluded with a panel of policy experts including Sir Paul Grice, Chief Executive of the Scottish Parliament, and Dr Audrey MacDougall, Chief Social Researcher at the Scottish Government.

The University of Stirling hosted the second lab, with a focus on UK research and innovation strategies and policies. The University of the West of Scotland will host the third lab at the start of July.

Each year Strathclyde provides internal assistance for potential applicants. Dr Emma Compton-Daw, of the University’s Organisational and Staff Development Unit (OSDU), along with previous Strathclyde Cruciblist mentors, offered advice on the career-enhancing benefits of applying for Scottish Crucible and provided direct support as part of the application process.

Applications for Scottish Crucible 2018 will open in December and staff interested in applying should contact OSDU for support.

Scottish Crucible. Round 2.

Round 2. Ding Ding.

The 2017 Scottish Crucible’s second lab was graciously hosted by Stirling University on June 1-2 and it rocked the campus. Literally. There was a blue man. A dinosaur. Drawing. Dancing. Sumptuous vistas. Oh yeah, there was a pretty nice castle too!

It began with this view.

Lab 2 was hosted by the irrepressible and commanding Sara Shinton. Honestly, sometimes the participants needed direction as they learnt the ins and outs of ‘brainstorming.’

(Or, as some of us called it: ‘thought-showering.’) No surprise, the phrase didn’t stick.

The thrust of Lab 2 was collaboration. We were enveloped in a cozy bubble, as Sara rightly put it.

How to work together! How to build lasting research partnerships to influence positive change! How to cut across fields and disciplines! The guest speakers were inspiring.

Being a drug historian, I have some thoughts about the tweet below but I’ll keep them to myself.

Chalk this up to aggressive dancing!

Day 2 included further in-depth training on how to develop and drive collaboration.

To start off with, we needed to draw out our research. No easy task.

However, there were other appearances.

For instance, a creepily self-satisfied Dragon…

An introspective blue dude…

DEFRA

But. But. But.

In my estimation, the most exhausting and rewarding moment of the weekend was…speed collaboration. Think speed dating, on steroids. (I am a drug historian).

The experience was supremely enjoyable. Also: Tiring. Amazing. Harrowing. Enriching. All of these. At the same time.

Minds were spinning.

Ding Ding. Bring on Round 3.

See the previous post on the Lab 1 here.

Or visit the Scottish Crucible here.

**

 

Creativity and Collaboration: An Amazing Body of Knowledge @ScotCrucible 2017

I just got back from Lab 1 of the Scottish Crucible. How to sum it up? So many ridiculously talented, clever, incredible people. From fish lice to fractals, to potato pathogens and Palimpsest. From diamond-based sensing to drug discovery, and so much more. Tsunamis and electric airplanes. Big data and biotransformations. Lasers and Norse poetry. And this doesn’t even cover half of it. These two days were mind-blowing, and I’m still reeling. What a privilege!

Special thanks to Vivenne Parry OBE, Dr Vicky Ingram, Dr Ruth Neiland, and Prof Alan Miller.

As I’m a story-teller (well, historian), what follows is a brief snapshot in Tweets.

LSD: Insight or Insanity?, 1968

From the NIH. A post by Professor Erika Dyck on the history of LSD.

Circulating Now from NLM

Circulating Now welcomes guest blogger Erika Dyck, PhD, Professor and Canada Research Chair in the History of Medicine at the University of Saskatchewan. Today, Dr. Dyck shares some insights on a recently digitized film in the Library’s collection highlighted in our Medical Movies on the Web project.

For Rebels, it’s a Kick…

It’s the late 1960s. Teenagers, a hip voice clues us in, are always looking for kicks, and today’s teens express themselves with cool fashions, groovy hairstyles, and kooky pranks. Not so long ago, our narrator played the character of “Plato,” a troubled teenager, in the 1955 classic Rebel Without a Cause. In that film, Plato idolizes the reckless machismo of young Jim Stark (played by James Dean). In an epic display of bravado, Jim and another boy play a game of “chickie run” in which they drive their cars in parallel directly toward a cliff. Jim leaps…

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Episode 6 of Pointscast Now Available!

Points: The Blog of the Alcohol & Drugs History Society

On the latest episode of Pointscast, the first, best, and only podcast of the Points blog, hosts Alex Tepperman and Kyle Bridge offer their thoughts on the ways domestic and international drug use are portrayed in American media. But first, for months listeners have been submitting questions for our expert Q&A series. Kyle opens the episode by asking Bob Beach (blbeach@suny.edu), a doctoral candidate at SUNY Albany and frequent Points contributor who studies cannabis use and policy before the 1937 Marijuana Tax Act, a simple question from a curious listener: why is weed illegal?

Be sure to check out the Pointscast Twitter and Facebook pages and listen to other episodes on Soundcloud! If you have questions for our Q&A series or general comments on the podcast, please email us at pointscast@gmail.com

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“Cold War Freud” and “Freud: An Intellectual Biography” reviewed by Lisa Appignanesi (The Guardian)

h-madness

H-Madness readers might be interested in the following article by Lisa Appignanesi. The piece, which was published today in The Guardian, is a review of Dagmar Herzog’s Cold War Freud(Cambridge University Press, 2016) and Joel Whitebook’s Freud: An Intellectual Biography (Cambridge University Press, 2016).

Still many strands to pursue … Sigmund Freud.

Cold War Freud and Freud: An Intellectual Biography review – the politics of psychoanalysis

A pair of rich, illuminating studies epitomise a new wave of thinking about the Freud wars and the history of analysis

If Freud, as Auden wrote in his 1939 elegy, is “a whole climate of opinion / under whom we conduct our different lives”, then it would be fair to say that the local weather patterns around him shift from temptestuous to clement with uncanny regularity. Geography inevitably plays into the picture.

There are actually only two (relative) constants in the diffusion of Freud’s invention, psychoanalysis, from…

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