Scottish Crucible. Round 2.

Round 2. Ding Ding.

The 2017 Scottish Crucible’s second lab was graciously hosted by Stirling University on June 1-2 and it rocked the campus. Literally. There was a blue man. A dinosaur. Drawing. Dancing. Sumptuous vistas. Oh yeah, there was a pretty nice castle too!

It began with this view.

Lab 2 was hosted by the irrepressible and commanding Sara Shinton. Honestly, sometimes the participants needed direction as they learnt the ins and outs of ‘brainstorming.’

(Or, as some of us called it: ‘thought-showering.’) No surprise, the phrase didn’t stick.

The thrust of Lab 2 was collaboration. We were enveloped in a cozy bubble, as Sara rightly put it.

How to work together! How to build lasting research partnerships to influence positive change! How to cut across fields and disciplines! The guest speakers were insipiring.

Being a drug historian, I have some thoughts about the tweet below but I’ll keep them to myself.

Chalk this up to aggressive dancing!

Day 2 included further in-depth training on how to develop and drive collaboration.

To start off with, we needed to draw out our research. No easy task.

However, there were other appearances.

For instance, a creepily self-satisfied Dragon…

An introspective blue dude…

DEFRA

But. But. But.

In my estimation, the most exhausting and rewarding of the weekend was…speed collaboration. Think speed dating, on steroids. (I am a drug historian).

The experience was supremely enjoyable. Also: Tiring. Amazing. Harrowing. Enriching. All of these. At the same time.

Minds were spinning.

Ding Ding. Bring on Round 3.

See the previous post on the Lab 1 here.

Or visit the Scottish Crucible here.

**

 

Creativity and Collaboration: An Amazing Body of Knowledge @ScotCrucible 2017

I just got back from Lab 1 of the Scottish Crucible. How to sum it up? So many ridiculously talented, clever, incredible people. From fish lice to fractals, to potato pathogens and Palimpsest. From diamond-based sensing to drug discovery, and so much more. Tsunamis and electric airplanes. Big data and biotransformations. Lasers and Norse poetry. And this doesn’t even cover half of it. These two days were mind-blowing, and I’m still reeling. What a privilege!

Special thanks to Vivenne Parry OBE, Dr Vicky Ingram, Dr Ruth Neiland, and Prof Alan Miller.

As I’m a story-teller (well, historian), what follows is a brief snapshot in Tweets.

LSD: Insight or Insanity?, 1968

From the NIH. A post by Professor Erika Dyck on the history of LSD.

Circulating Now from NLM

Circulating Now welcomes guest blogger Erika Dyck, PhD, Professor and Canada Research Chair in the History of Medicine at the University of Saskatchewan. Today, Dr. Dyck shares some insights on a recently digitized film in the Library’s collection highlighted in our Medical Movies on the Web project.

For Rebels, it’s a Kick…

It’s the late 1960s. Teenagers, a hip voice clues us in, are always looking for kicks, and today’s teens express themselves with cool fashions, groovy hairstyles, and kooky pranks. Not so long ago, our narrator played the character of “Plato,” a troubled teenager, in the 1955 classic Rebel Without a Cause. In that film, Plato idolizes the reckless machismo of young Jim Stark (played by James Dean). In an epic display of bravado, Jim and another boy play a game of “chickie run” in which they drive their cars in parallel directly toward a cliff. Jim leaps…

View original post 623 more words

Episode 6 of Pointscast Now Available!

Points: The Blog of the Alcohol & Drugs History Society

On the latest episode of Pointscast, the first, best, and only podcast of the Points blog, hosts Alex Tepperman and Kyle Bridge offer their thoughts on the ways domestic and international drug use are portrayed in American media. But first, for months listeners have been submitting questions for our expert Q&A series. Kyle opens the episode by asking Bob Beach (blbeach@suny.edu), a doctoral candidate at SUNY Albany and frequent Points contributor who studies cannabis use and policy before the 1937 Marijuana Tax Act, a simple question from a curious listener: why is weed illegal?

Be sure to check out the Pointscast Twitter and Facebook pages and listen to other episodes on Soundcloud! If you have questions for our Q&A series or general comments on the podcast, please email us at pointscast@gmail.com

View original post

“Cold War Freud” and “Freud: An Intellectual Biography” reviewed by Lisa Appignanesi (The Guardian)

h-madness

H-Madness readers might be interested in the following article by Lisa Appignanesi. The piece, which was published today in The Guardian, is a review of Dagmar Herzog’s Cold War Freud(Cambridge University Press, 2016) and Joel Whitebook’s Freud: An Intellectual Biography (Cambridge University Press, 2016).

Still many strands to pursue … Sigmund Freud.

Cold War Freud and Freud: An Intellectual Biography review – the politics of psychoanalysis

A pair of rich, illuminating studies epitomise a new wave of thinking about the Freud wars and the history of analysis

If Freud, as Auden wrote in his 1939 elegy, is “a whole climate of opinion / under whom we conduct our different lives”, then it would be fair to say that the local weather patterns around him shift from temptestuous to clement with uncanny regularity. Geography inevitably plays into the picture.

There are actually only two (relative) constants in the diffusion of Freud’s invention, psychoanalysis, from…

View original post 240 more words

Incidences of Syphilis Amongst Jefferson’s Neurosurgery Patients

There are a handful of incidents of syphilis, more specifically neurosyphilis, amongst Geoffrey Jefferson’s neurosurgery patient files. Given the prevalence of syphilis during the first half of the…

Source: Incidences of Syphilis Amongst Jefferson’s Neurosurgery Patients

Back to the Future: Addiction and the Scientific Method

A few changes to the original.

Erika Dyck. Not Erica.
And the poster winner was Dr Ved Baruah of Strathclyde University.

Points: The Blog of the Alcohol & Drugs History Society

Editor’s Note: Happy Valentine’s Day! Today’s post on a recent joint conference between the Alcohol and Drugs History Society (ADHS) and the Society for the Study of Addiction comes courtesy of ADHS president Virginia Berridge.

cropped-adhs_hogarthlogoSociety for the Study of Addiction conference joint with the Alcohol and Drugs History Society York England, November 2016

The Society for the Study of Addiction is one of the oldest international societies in the substance use field. It began as the Society for the Study and Cure of Inebriety in the 1880s. It publishes the high impact journal Addiction (known to historians under its historic name of the British Journal of Inebriety).

View original post 462 more words

What Historians Wish people Knew About Drugs, Part II: Isaac Campos

Here is a great piece by Dr Campis on drugs.

Points: The Blog of the Alcohol & Drugs History Society

Editor’s Note: At the 2017 American Historical Association in Denver, several historians with relevant research interests participated in a roundtable discussion, What Historians Wish People Knew about Licit and Illicit Drugs.” Keeping with the spirit of the title, Points is delighted to publish some of the panelists’ opening remarks in a temporary new series over the coming weeks. Our second installment is brought to you by Isaac Campos, associate professor at the University of Cincinnati. Also be sure to check out last week’s series premier by Miriam Kingsberg Kadia.

I’d just like to make five quick points with respect to what I wish all people knew about drug history.

First, humans have been taking psychoactive drugs since humans discovered psychoactive drugs. There seems to be a fundamental human attraction to altered states of consciousness if not a fundamental human need for it. This is old news to…

View original post 874 more words

University of Strathclyde

I just started a new job as a Lecturer at the University of Strathclyde, based in Glasgow. I’m absolutely thrilled to be a part of the School of Humanities and Social Sciences. It was a big, big move – from Saskatchewan to Strathclyde – and, to be honest, I’m still making the adjustment.

( Chips v. Fries ** Football v. Soccer ** Jumper v. Sweater ** Pants v. Underwear ** and so on, and so on…)

Luckily, the transition has been eased by amazing new colleagues, who are quite simply awesome. All the worst horror stories you hear about in academia, including internecine squabbling or raging egomaniacal personalities colliding with each other over hum-drum topics, aren’t an issue here. There’s way too much collegiality and friendliness. Everyone’s chipping in. It’s weird. And I like it.

I will be helping with two modules: (1) Disease and Society & (2) Madness and Society. It’s gonna be a blast!

Are you an Anti-Vaxxer?

Why do we question vaccines? And who are the thought leaders involved? Are they respectable, or are they hacks? And, more importantly, what can we glean from past debates about vaccines? In Elena Conis’s new book, we get a sense of this – and so much more.

conis book image

In the newest edition of Social History of Medicine, I review Elena Conis’s new book, Vaccine Nation: America’s Changing Relationship with Immunization.

In tracing over 50 years of vaccine controversy, we get to know the key institutions, opinion leaders, and major ideas that have driven debates. We are exposed to federal law, feminism, and, oh yeah, Jenny McCarthy and the mass media.

She began her career in 1993 as a nude model for Playboy magazine and was later named their Playmate of the Year. McCarthy then parlayed this fame into a television and film acting career. She is a former co-host of the ABC talk show The View.

McCarthy has also written books about parenting and has become an activist promoting research into environmental causes and alternative medical treatments for autism. In particular, she has promoted the idea that vaccines cause autism and that chelation therapy helped cure her son of autism.

Both claims are unsupported by medical consensus, and her son’s autism diagnosis has been questioned. McCarthy has been described as “the nation’s most prominent purveyor of anti-vaxxer ideology”, but she has denied the charge, stating: “I am not anti-vaccine…”

jenny_mccarthy

In Conis’s book, we get a better understanding of how someone like McCarthy can drive the policy process and shape our View on vaccines.

Here is a brief excerpt from the review:

“Vaccines are significant medical interventions that naturally induce powerful economic, social, and political reactions. Vaccines have helped shaped narratives about American scientific and technological ingenuity, as well as therapeutic progress, yet they have also been ‘cast in the image of their own time’ (p. 10), The pathway to effective, accepted vaccines has been neither simple nor straightforward.

In Elena Conis’s penetrating new book, Vaccine Nation, this fluid negotiation over vaccines for polio, pertussis and Human papillomavirus (HPV), among others, is on full display. We are exposed to a ‘wildly diverse set of influences, including Cold War anxiety, the growing value of children, the emergence of HIV/AIDS, changing fashion trends, and immigration’, that have shaped vaccine acceptance—as well as resistance (pp. 2–3). Conis, a former journalist, offers punchy and accessible prose as she skilfully traces the ebb-and-flow of vaccine history from the 1960s to the present.”

*

If you’re interested, PBS has done a great job covering anti-vaccination in the U.S.