Gender and Critical Drug Studies: The Gendered Origins of Privatized Prison Drug Treatment

Originally posted on Points: The Blog of the Alcohol & Drugs History Society:
Editor’s Note: Today’s post comes from Dr. Jill McCorkel, associate professor of sociology ad criminology at Villanova University in Pennsylvania. In it, she explores the origins of how drug treatment and rehabilitation programs entered private prisons for women. Her full article appears in…

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From Calcutta in 1890 to Canada Today: Exercises in Cannabis Legalization

Originally posted on Points: The Blog of the Alcohol & Drugs History Society:
Editor’s Note: Today’s post comes from Peter Hynd, a PhD candidate in history at McGill University in Quebec, based on the paper he presented at the Cannabis: Global Histories conference held at the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, on April 19-20, 2018. In…

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Forces of necessity: The role of lay knowledge and advocacy in the re-medicalization of cannabis, 1973-2004

Originally posted on Points: The Blog of the Alcohol & Drugs History Society:
Editor’s Note: Today’s post comes from Dr. Suzanne Taylor, Research Fellow at the Centre for History in Public Health, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, and is based off of her presentation at the Cannabis: Global Histories conference, held at the…

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New article: Mental health and the patient politics of subsidiarity in Scotland

Originally posted on h-madness:
The article “From associations to action: mental health and the patient politics of subsidiarity in Scotland” by Mark Gallagher might be of interest to h-madness readers. It was published on 27 March 2018 in Palgrave Communications 4. The abstract reads: In times of economic hardship public mental healthcare suffers a double…

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This is what precarity feels like: Early Career Researchers and “cruel optimism”

Originally posted on All the Single Writing Ladies:
The AHRC defines of “Early Career Researchers” (ECRs) as individuals “within eight years of the award of their PhD […] or within six years of their first academic appointment.” In practice, ECRs are a highly heterogeneous demographic comprising individuals in a range of employment circumstances, from hourly…

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