Vaccine History in CBMH/BCHM

Vaccine & Immunization History in CBMH/BCHM

banner_literatum6

The roadway to effective, accepted vaccines in history is neither smooth nor straight. Vaccines naturally induce potent social, political, and economic responses. They raise questions about scientific authority and the production of medical knowledge. Even more, vaccines have challenged the physician’s influence over patient-consumer choice in the medical marketplace, as anyone who watched Jenny McCarthy shape the discussion over autism and anti-vaccination can attest.

jenny_mccarthy

 

In 2016, commentators and historians are addressing this subject with verve. Many texts – hastily rushed to print after widespread media coverage of Jenny McCarthy’s campaign against vaccines – are aimed at a general audience, whereas others target more specialized academic and historical audiences. Two fine entries in the latter group include Elena Conis’s Vaccine Nation: America’s Changing Relationship with Immunization (Chicago UP, 2014) and Stephen Mawdsley’s very recent Selling Science: Polio and the Promise of Gamma Globulin (Rutgers UP, 2016), both of which concentrate largely on the second half of the twentieth century.

*Conis was the plenary speaker at the recent meeting in Calgary*

* Mawdsley, of course, is CSHM-SCHM ‘s website manager and editor *

And with Karen L. Walloch’s important new book, The Antivaccine Heresy: Jacobson v. Massachusetts and the Troubled History of Compulsory Vaccination in the United States (Rochester UP, 2015), we are exposed to much earlier wrangling over vaccination – specifically, compulsory vaccination – in the United States. Set against the vivid, shifting backdrop of Progressive-era ferment and, more particularly, a modern paradigm of public health predicated on the rise of bacteriology, Walloch examines the landmark Jacobson v. Massachusetts decision of 1905, which upheld a state statute mandating vaccination.

For the authors listed above, resistance to immunization or other medical decisions is not borne out of singular ignorance, nor is it always a function of big government, anti-medical establishment paranoia.

(To be sure, there are very real consequences of ignoring the best scientific evidence on inoculating agent – and there are dangers in not redressing the consequences of ignoring the best scientific evidence and tackling counter-narratives, as in the case of Nicoli Nattrass’ The AIDS Conspiracy: Science Fights Back. I have noted this elsewhere).

However, by treating antivaccinationist views coolly, and in seeking to appreciate why well-educated and reasonable people objected to medical innovation, the authors are suggesting that we may develop more sophisticated responses to vaccine counter-narratives and counter-knowledges in the present.

*****

Vaccine history is old hat for CBMH/BCHM readers, considering such scholars as Katherine Arnup, Barbara Tunis, Maureen Lux, and W.B. Spaulding have all contributed to the historical discussion of inoculation and vaccines.

Indeed, the very first article of the very first issue focussed on Dr James Latham, a “pioneer inoculator.” According to Barbara Tunis, “little has been known of his life or subsequent career” and the “intention of this short biography” was to “examine the broader content of his career as an inoculator and his years in North America.” (1) In unpacking his life and medical practice, Tunis finds that Latham, who lived from 1734-1799, was “materialistic” in his approach to the craft and “following a trend already established in England and America…” (11) It’s an intriguing article!

Later, William Spaulding’s “The Ontario Vaccine Farm, 1885-1916” builds on the work of Tunis and charts Canada’s response to smallpox.  “Established in 1885 by Dr. Alexander Stewart, a local physician, the Ontario Vaccine Farm was the first institution to produce smallpox vaccine in Ontario,” writes Spaulding. (54) The Farm originally consisted of a converted barn where Stewart employed government-approved methods for obtaining and processing vaccine from inoculated calves – and the article is made even more interesting through its inclusion of illustrations.

In 1992, Katherine Arnup once more placed a spotlight on Ontario vaccination, with “Victims of Vaccination?: Opposition to Compulsory Immunization in Ontario, 1900-90.” And, just as Elena Conis and Karen Walloch have recently underlined the tense back-and-forth, push-and-pull among supporters and detractors of vaccination, Arnup does the same. On the one hand, she focuses on the social and political dimensions of a particular struggle over compulsory vaccination against smallpox in the city of Toronto during the first two decades of the 20th century. One the other hand, Arnup turned to contemporary debates, “to the current controversy over the use of the pertussis vaccine, examining the work of the Committee Against Compulsory Vaccination, the group battling against immunization legislation…” (159-160)

And her conclusion certainly presages many of the findings and sentiments found within recent work that give more credence to anti-vaxxers, vaccine hesitance, and vaccine resistors:

“One of the lessons that history can teach us is that in dismissing the opponents of immunization as ‘mere nonentities’ we underestimate the appeal that their message has. Although the vast majority of parents today opt for immunization for their children, increasing numbers of people are expressing concerns about its safety. While there are undoubtedly fanatics among the opponents of immunization, there are also many thousands of concerned parents, wondering what is best for their children.” (171)

In its balance and tenor, it’s strikingly similar to what’s emerging now!

Finally, with Lux’s “Perfect Subjects: Race, Tuberculosis,and the Qu’Appelle BCG Vaccine Trial,” the historiography shifts further forward chronologically and begins to include Indigenous peoples of Canada. The article also recasts Canadian vaccine history somewhat, as it uses themes of experimentation and colonialism to help tell a story about medial knowledge creation and Tuberculosis.

It’s a harrowing piece of scholarship (think Ian Mosby and Susan Reverby) that has the ability to make the reader uncomfortable, even angry. As Lux puts it, “The BCG trial at the Qu’Appelle reserves must be viewed in the historical context of Native-White relations. Native people were viewed as primitives and strangers in their own land and in need of fundamental change.” (291)

*****

Why do we question vaccines? And who are the thought leaders involved? Are they respectable, or are they hacks? And, more importantly, what can we glean from past debates about vaccines? Yes, the answers to these questions are being debated in brand new scholarship related to the United States and elsewhere, but (as noted in a previous post) it’s exciting that CBMH/BCMH readers were exposed to such historical questions from the journals’s beginnings.

(Please watch for a French version soon)

For more on what I’m doing with the CBMH/BCMH, please see the announcement here.

*****

FRENCH VERSION

Lhistoire de la vaccination et du vaccin dans le CBMH/BCHM

L’histoire nous montre que la route qui mène à des vaccins efficaces et acceptés est truffée d’embuche. Les vaccins entrainent systématiquement d’importants bouleversements sociaux, politiques et économiques. Ils soulèvent des questions relatives à l’autorité scientifique et à la production de savoir médical. Par ailleurs, les vaccins ont contesté l’influence du médecin pour tout ce qui a trait au choix des patients-consommateurs sur le marché médical, comme tous ceux qui ont pu voir Jenny McCarthy mener la discussion sur l’autisme et l’anti-vaccination peuvent en témoigner.

En 2016, les commentateurs et les historiens se penchent sur ce sujet avec brio. Beaucoup de textes (imprimés à la va-vite après une importante couverture médiatique de la campagne de Jenny McCarthy contre les vaccins) sont destinés à un public profane, tandis que d’autres ciblent des auditoires d’universitaires et d’historiens plus spécialisés. Citons comme contributions notables dans la seconde catégorie Vaccine Nation: America’s Changing Relationship with Immunization (Chicago UP, 2014) et Selling Science: Polio and the Promise of Gamma Globulin (Rutgers UP, 2016) par Elena Conis et très récemment par Stephen Mawdsley, qui se concentrent principalement sur la seconde moitié du XXe siècle.

* Conis était la conférencière en séance plénière lors de la récente réunion à Calgary *

* Mawdsley, bien sûr, est l’administrateur du site CSHM-SCHM *

Et avec l’important nouveau livre de Karen L. Walloch, The Antivaccine Heresy: Jacobson v. Massachusetts and the Troubled History of Compulsory Vaccination in the United States (Rochester UP, 2015), on apprend que les querelles concernant la vaccination aux Etats-Unis sont bien plus anciennes (en particulier, la vaccination obligatoire). Avec pour toile de fond cette ère Progressiste vive et mouvementée et, plus particulièrement, un paradigme moderne de santé publique fondée sur l’influence grandissante de la bactériologie, Walloch examine la décision historique Jacobson v. Massachusetts de 1905, qui a confirmé une loi de l’État rendant obligatoire la vaccination.

Pour les auteurs énumérés ci-dessus, la résistance à la vaccination ou à d’autres décisions médicales n’est pas le fruit d’une ignorance singulière. Elle n’est pas non plus la conséquence systématique d’une méfiance paranoïaque envers un gouvernement puissant ou envers le système médical.

Pour sûr, ignorer les meilleures preuves scientifiques concernant l’agent inoculant n’est pas sans conséquences et il est dangereux de ne pas pallier à cette ignorance des meilleures preuves scientifiques et de ne pas lutter contre les récits révisionnistes, comme dans le cas de The AIDS Conspiracy: Science Fights Back par Nicoli Nattrass. Et j’ai constaté ça ailleurs.

Cependant, en examinant les points de vue « anti-vaccinationistes » froidement, et en cherchant à comprendre pourquoi des personnes aussi bien éduquées et raisonnables ont pu s’opposer à l’innovation médicale, les auteurs suggèrent que l’on peut aujourd’hui développer des réponses plus sophistiquées aux récits révisionnistes et aux contre-vérités.

*****

Les lecteurs de CBMH / BCHM en sont bien conscients, étant donné que des chercheurs comme Katherine Arnup, Barbara Tunis, Maureen Lux et W.B. Spaulding ont tous contribué à la discussion historique de l’inoculation et les vaccins.

En effet, le tout premier article du tout premier numéro portait sur le Dr James Latham, un « pionnier de l’inoculation. » Selon Barbara Tunis, «  on connait très peu de sa vie ou de sa carrière ultérieure» et «le but de cette courte biographie » est « d’examiner le contenu plus large de sa carrière en tant « inoculateur » et ses années en Amérique du Nord. » (1) En examinant sa vie et sa pratique médicale, Tunis estime que Latham, qui a vécu de 1734 à 1799, était «matérialiste» dans son rapport à sa pratique et «suivait une tendance déjà établie en Angleterre et en Amérique … » (11 ) C’est un article fascinant !

Par la suite, « The Farm Vaccine Ontario, 1885-1916 » de William Spaulding s’appuie sur les travaux de Tunis et analyse la réponse du Canada à la variole. « Fondée en 1885 par le Dr Alexander Stewart, un médecin local, la Ferme à vaccin de l’Ontario (Ontario Vaccine Farm) a été la première institution à produire le vaccin contre la variole en Ontario», écrit Spaulding. (54) La Ferme se composait initialement d’une grange aménagée dans laquelle Stewart employait des méthodes approuvées par le gouvernement pour l’obtention et la fabrication de vaccins à partir de veaux inoculés. Les illustrations rendent l’article encore plus intéressant.

En 1992, Katherine Arnup mit une fois de plus en lumière la vaccination en Ontario, avec « Victims of Vaccination?: Opposition to Compulsory Immunization in Ontario, 1900-90. » Et, tout comme Elena Conis et Karen Walloch ont récemment souligné les tensions liées au va-et-vient parmi les partisans et les détracteurs de la vaccination, Arnup fait de même ici. D’une part, elle s’attarde sur les dimensions sociales et politiques d’une lutte particulière portant sur la vaccination obligatoire contre la variole dans la ville de Toronto au cours des deux premières décennies du 20e siècle. D’ autre part, Arnup s’intéresse aux débats contemporains : « la controverse actuelle concernant l’utilisation du vaccin contre la coqueluche, examinant les travaux du Comité contre la vaccination obligatoire (Committee Against Compulsory Vaccination), qui luttait contre la législation de vaccination …» (159-160)

Et sa conclusion précède certainement beaucoup d’idées et d’impressions que l’on peut trouver dans certains travaux récents qui donnent plus de crédibilité aux anti-vaccinationistes, l’hésitation des vaccins et des résistances de vaccins :

« L’une des leçons que l’on peut tirer de l’histoire, c’est qu’en rejetant les adversaires de la vaccination comme de « simples nullités », nous sous-estimons la portée de leur message. Bien qu’aujourd’hui la grande majorité des parents opte pour la vaccination de leurs enfants, beaucoup de personnes émettent des réserves quant à sa sécurité. C’est sûr qu’il existe des fanatiques parmi les opposants à la vaccination, mais il y a aussi des milliers de parents inquiets qui se demandent ce qui est le mieux pour leurs enfants. » (171)

Dans son équilibre et sa teneur, c’est étonnamment similaire à ce qui est en train d’émerger !

Enfin, avec « Perfect Sujets: Race, Tuberculosis and the Qu’Appelle Vaccin BCG Trial, » écrit par Lux, l’historiographie se penche sur des sujets plus contemporains et commence à inclure les peuples autochtones du Canada. D’une certaine manière, l’article refonde également l’histoire du vaccin au Canada, étant donné qu’il a recours aux thèmes de l’expérimentation et du colonialisme pour raconter une histoire de la création des connaissances médicales et de la tuberculose. C’est un article poignant (cf. Ian Mosby et Susan Reverby), qui a la faculté de mettre le lecteur mal à l’aise, voire en colère. Comme Lux le dit, « Le procès BCG dans les réserves Qu’Appelle doit être étudié dans le contexte historique des relations autochtones-Blanc. Les autochtones étaient considérés comme des êtres primitifs et des étrangers au sein de leur propre pays et comme nécessitant un changement fondamental. » (291)

****

Pourquoi nous interrogeons-nous sur les vaccins ? Et qui sont les leaders d’opinion concernés ? Sont-ils respectables ou sont-ils des imposteurs ? Et, de manière plus importante, que pouvons-nous tirer des débats d’antan sur les vaccins ? Oui, les réponses à ces questions sont débattues dans de nouvelles études portant sur les Etats-Unis et ailleurs, mais (comme indiqué dans un précédent post), c’est stimulant de penser que les lecteurs de CBMH/BCMH ont été exposés à de telles questions historiques depuis les débuts de la revue.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s