Mixed reviews for the Allard marijuana decision

Cannabis. Pot. Marijuana. Ganga. Weed. Grass. These are interesting times for sure.

I was interviewed for the Saskatoon local news on the recent Allard decision. Honestly, I wasn’t terribly happy with this interview, but it can be viewed here.

http://globalnews.ca/video/2541487/mixed-reviews-for-federal-court-marijuana-decision

Finally:

I would like to be upfront about something. The Global story used the word “Professor” to describe me, which is something I most certainly DID NOT call myself. I referred to myself as an instructor in history and a sessional lecturer in history.

Many people casually use the word PROFESSOR to describe all those individuals who offer classes within a university setting. There is, however, a scale and hierarchy of individuals who work in an academic department. A full PROFESSOR is highest level that can be reached.

uk_v_us_academicranks1

And that is not at all me. It is regrettable that I was designated in this way. Just wanted to clarify.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Mixed reviews for the Allard marijuana decision

  1. One time when I was teaching just one course and not a faculty member, a friend of my mom who was also principal at a university college referred to me as “professor.” When my mom countered that I was teaching only one course he said “he teaches at a university so he’s a professor.” She was proud; I was embarrassed. But the point is if a liberal arts college principal insists that an instructor may be called a professor, then you should not worry about any criticism launched by someone who gets pissy about the title the media puts under your name. However, once you’re an associate professor, feel free to get pissy when someone calls you “assistant professor.” 😉

    Like

    1. I caught that “slip” during the conference! After you left, a few of my buddies and I went and cornered the offender with large sticks, which we then used to point at graphs and pie charts for roughly an hour-and-a-half. By the end of the ninety minute lecture (which also featured powerpoints), a brutal lesson had been learned and severe justice had been meted out.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s